Save

Parents Push For Mental Health Education

20 September 2016 Written by 

Teaching kids about drugs, alcohol and sex appears to be less controversial than ever before with the majority of parents in a new poll saying schools should and do teach these subjects. Many parents want more -- saying those topics are not enough -- finds the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. Researchers surveyed a nationally representative sample of parents with kids in middle or high school.

Two-thirds of parents polled say schools should definitely cover emotional and mental health issues -- which may include such subjects as dealing with depression, stress and bullying -- yet only a third say these topics are currently covered by their child's school.

Another 68 percent of parents want to see schools cover basic first aid, and 63 percent say kids should learn CPR.

"Most parents today support traditional health education topics like pregnancy prevention, drug abuse and other risk behaviors that used to generate more debate in years past. However, they clearly perceive a gap between what their children need and what they are receiving in the area of mental health education, as well as basic first aid and CPR," says Sarah Clark, M.P.H., co-director of the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health.

"We are seeing increasing concerns for such issues as stress, depression and suicide among young people, and parents want schools to be a part of the solution. These results suggest that the stigma of mental health issues may have relaxed among today's parents, in favor of using a broad array of resources to help children and adolescents with these critical areas."

Content Originally Published By: The Science Daily

Read 285 times Last modified on Tuesday, 01 November 2016 13:52
Rate this item
(0 votes)