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Children And Edible Marijuana

25 August 2016 Written by 

Keeping Edible Marijuana Out Of The Reach Of Children.

 

From Science Daily: A new report identifies factors that make food attractive to children. Commissioned by the state Liquor and Cannabis Board, the report studied research on what makes food appeal to children and the role that marketing and branding play.

When Washington legalized recreational marijuana in 2012, a primary concern was how to ensure it was kept out of the reach of children.

While skunky-smelling buds of dried marijuana are not likely to appeal to children, cannabis-infused edibles such as brownies, cookies and candies could. And with edibles making up a sizable and growing segment of the pot market, states are grappling with how to regulate those products to most effectively protect children.

A new report from the University of Washington School of Law's Cannabis Law and Policy Project furthers those efforts by identifying the factors that make food attractive to children. Commissioned by the state Liquor and Cannabis Board, the report involved looking at research on what physical elements of food appeal to children and the role that marketing and branding play.

Among the report's findings:

  • Color is a key factor in children's food choices, with red, orange, yellow and green foods preferred
  • Food in novel shapes such as stars or animals is more appealing to children than food cut into slices or sticks
  • Children like foods that smell sweet, fruity or like candy
  • Taste, rather than smell, is a more useful deterrent for children
  • Odor alone is unlikely to deter children
  • Cartoon and other promotional characters powerfully influence children's food preferences
  • Advertising influences food and beverage choices among children aged 2 to 11, but there is less evidence that teens are swayed by food advertising

Sam Méndez, executive director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project, said while the research focused on children's food preferences generally, the findings are applicable to how children might approach cannabis-infused edibles.

"There is scant research of testing children with cannabis-infused edibles, and for good ethical reasons," he said. "So we looked at research on regular food products -- but the same factors that make particular foods appealing to children, such as taste, color and packaging, would likely also apply to edibles."

The report also looked at marijuana cannabis packaging and labeling regulations in various states. Most states require edibles to be sold in child-resistant, opaque packaging. Washington introduced rules in 2014 prohibiting recreational marijuana cannabis stores from selling gummy bears, lollipops and cotton candy infused with cannabis, and also prohibits cannabis products that require cooking or baking.

Read more: Factors that might attract children to marijuana edibles

Read 278 times Last modified on Monday, 29 August 2016 14:12
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