Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Family Often Source Of Pain Medicine Abuse

11 September 2016 Written by 

More Than Half Of People Who Misused Pain Medicines Got Them From Family, Friends

From Addiction Professional By Julie Miller, Editor in Chief: In a comprehensive study of prescription drug misuse, SAMHSA found that friends and family are the most common sources supplying pain drugs to those who misuse them. It’s a clear wakeup call for behavioral health professionals and advocates for prevention.

The National Survey on Drug Use and Health released Thursday collected data on misuse of prescription psychotherapeutic drugs in 2015 and found that 53.7% of those who reported misuse of pain drugs, such as oxycodone and hydrocodone products, said they got them from a friend or relative. When drilling down into that data point, perhaps even more significant is that the pain drugs obtained from the friend or relative typically (40.5%) were shared for free. Another 9.4% of those responding said they paid friends and family for them, and 3.8% reported stealing them from friends or family.

“People even offer me their medication, even knowing the work I do,” says Kimberly Johnson, PhD, director of Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) within SAMHSA.

Johnson says it’s common for consumers to share their medications, and there is a serious opportunity for enhanced education about the dangers of well-meaning friends and family offering their pain drugs to others. Interestingly, many prevention programs tied to today’s opioid crisis are focused on changing prescribing patterns of medical professionals, yet the survey found that medical providers are the source of pain medications in 36.4% of misuse responses, compared to the 53.7% of responses attributing friends and family as the source.

In a comprehensive study of prescription drug misuse, SAMHSA found that friends and family are the most common sources supplying pain drugs to those who misuse them. It’s a clear wakeup call for behavioral health professionals and advocates for prevention.

The National Survey on Drug Use and Health released Thursday collected data on misuse of prescription psychotherapeutic drugs in 2015 and found that 53.7% of those who reported misuse of pain drugs, such as oxycodone and hydrocodone products, said they got them from a friend or relative. When drilling down into that data point, perhaps even more significant is that the pain drugs obtained from the friend or relative typically (40.5%) were shared for free. Another 9.4% of those responding said they paid friends and family for them, and 3.8% reported stealing them from friends or family.

“People even offer me their medication, even knowing the work I do,” says Kimberly Johnson, PhD, director of Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) within SAMHSA.

Johnson says it’s common for consumers to share their medications, and there is a serious opportunity for enhanced education about the dangers of well-meaning friends and family offering their pain drugs to others. Interestingly, many prevention programs tied to today’s opioid crisis are focused on changing prescribing patterns of medical professionals, yet the survey found that medical providers are the source of pain medications in 36.4% of misuse responses, compared to the 53.7% of responses attributing friends and family as the source.

Read more: Well-meaning friends fuel pain-drug misuse

Read 517 times Last modified on Thursday, 15 September 2016 15:50
Rate this item
(0 votes)