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Mis-Takes and Do-Overs in Recovery

05 November 2015 Written by 

In life and the movies, the first take is never the last one. “You can never make the same mistake twice because the second time you make it, it's not a mistake, it's a choice.” - Unknown

What You Know And Do Can Hurt You

If you knew that behind the door to a familiar room was a ferocious lion waiting to pounce on you and devour you whole, how likely would you be to enter? In a conscious, aware and mindful moment, your answer would be, “Are you crazy?” What if in the same four walls was your drug or behavior of choice? Would you practice denial that it was being guarded by the lion and blindly walk in? Chances are, when being led by cravings, you would indeed walk through the portal.

Mistake And Choice 

Consider the first time you picked up. Perhaps you were introduced to the substance by a family member or friend, or you used it to self-medicate physical or emotional pain. All you knew at the time was that it met a need and you wanted more of it. That was where the line was drawn between mistake and choice. Each time you stepped across it, you entered into a zone in which the drug began making choices for you that were not in your best interests.

Take Two In The Movie Means Trying Again 

Have you ever been on a movie set, on which the words “take two (or three or four) are uttered by the director? That is said because he or she wants the best possible scene to be shot and the finished product to be stellar. Although it would be wonderful to nail the scene on the first take, it is rare and sometimes it requires several to get it just right. 

What Is A Moment Of Clarity

When facing recovery, a moment of clarity may be all it takes to recognize that we too get to exercise several ‘takes’ to change the outcome. Patty, whose addictions led to serious health conditions needed to face choices she made. She has come to recognize that she couldn’t go back to what had become ‘normal’ in her behaviors. Her normal way of doing things brought her the initial suffering. Patty’s giving herself permission to create a new normal and experience do-overs, has led to an improved sense of wellbeing. 

How Did We Get Here

When each of us recognizes the steps it took to get us to this moment in time, we can exercise discernment in all we do and adapt our behaviors to meet the needs that addiction once filled. In other words, we can do something else.

Reach Out Recovery Exclusive By: Edie Weinstein

Read 722 times Last modified on Monday, 07 November 2016 16:14
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Edie Weinstien

Rev. Edie Weinstein, LSW  is an ‘opti-mystic who views life through the eyes of possibility. Her creative, career and spiritual paths have led her to become a writer, speaker, interfaith minister, reiki master, clown, greeting card text writer and social worker. She engages in life fully, inviting others to join her. As a guide, she holds a mirror up to those with whom she works, so that they may see their own beauty and discover their own answers.
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